August 2, 2014 - Sesamoid Injuries

  • August 12, 2014
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Sesamoid injuries can be difficult to repair and even catastrophic; here’s what can go wrong and how to prevent it from happening

by Tracy Gantz 

Two little bones sitting at the back of the fetlock both amaze and confound veterinarians. The sesamoids, as they’re called, anchor the suspensory apparatus that allows a horse’s foot and fetlock to move properly. Yet their location and anatomy make them vulnerable to injuries that can be difficult to repair and even catastrophic. Given the sesamoids’ location, it isn’t surprising that high speeds can lead to fractures and soft tissue injuries. In a racehorse, for example, the fetlock can sometimes extend to the point that the sesamoid bones actually make contact with the ground. If the pressure is too great, those bones can shatter so badly that euthanasia is required.

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