9,000 job applications and a Flamingo included.

Recently Tom LaMarra posted a story on the progress of Hialeah park opening once again in Florida. Being in the industry for only a few years, I honestly have no idea what the historical relevance of Hialeah is.

Then I asked a co-worker and did some research on Hialeah. As a racing newb, I would have to say the research was fascinating. My colleague mentioned the Flamingo, so of course I had to go research that race. I always found it fascinating how Flamingos are colored pink, because of what they eat.

Bigger than the Florida Derby?!

Yep, that is what my co-worker said, "it was bigger than the Florida Derby." The Flamingo was a grade III in its day and was a bigger Kentucky Derby (gr. I) prep race than the Florida Derby, which is almost THE Derby prep race today. 2001 was the 70th running of the race.

The Flamingo held the presences of Nashua, Northern Dancer, and Spectacular Bid who was its last winner to win the Kentucky Derby.

The park closed in 2001, and so I have read one of the last Flamingo stories about Hialeah with no other than Outofthebox. I honestly did not know who Outofthebox was previous to this race.

Outofthebox had finished second in both the Fountain of Youth Stakes (gr. I) and the Florida Derby (gr. I) prior to the Flamingo. No short feat and quite impressive. Racing against such competition as Monarchos, but missing the Kentucky Derby due to injury. However Thunder Blitz nabbed the win in the Flamingo against Outofthebox.

Outofthebox is a Montbrook in the Buckpasser line. A lifetime record of 16-5-4-3, and winning the 2001 Florida champion 3-year-old award.

The re-opening of Hialeah park has collected 9,000 job seekers already, which is a real need in our economy. What excites me is this racetrack with its plans of a casino involved in its reworking, is it will cater to "Class A Thoroughbred racing" but also will have a large Quarter horse racing presence. Quarter horse racing is very big in the south.

How big?

A story comes to mind from a trip to Florida I made two years ago. I have a very good friend who is a Manga artist, the first American to work for a major Manga company in Japan actually, and we were going to a huge convention where he was a guest of honor speaking on some panels and hosting a meet and greet table.

On our way home from this convention we stopped in at Applebees for dinner and our waitress saw I was wearing a Keeneland hat. She started asking me a few questions, one of which was, "What does your hat mean?" And I mentioned, "We are from Kentucky and Keeneland is a racetrack up there."

The young waitress started talking about Quarter Horse racing and explained how she trains Quarter Horses for racing around Florida. I explained that it was actually a Thoroughbred track, but was interested in learning about Quarter Horses so we chatted for a while. I think she was a little taken back by the Thoroughbred angle, but no big deal. I like all equids and am just as interested in warmbloods and mules as I am in Thoroughbreds. She was a pleasant conversation.

We did make it back after driving all night and I slept the trip back, as my other friends kept each other awake and when they dropped me off at my place, I came straight to work.

So now I need your help. What you remember from Hialeah before its long slumber began?


---

Listen:


If you have a few minutes to spare around 7:30 tonight, Tues. June 9th, you can check out my brief opinion on Sports Nightly. The great Dick Gabriel has a wonderful sports show that is always entertaining and asked my opinions on VLTs and the Kentucky racing status and the future of racing.

http://www.wlap.com/pages/sportsnightly.html

41 Comments

Leave a Comment:

Somethingroyal

I wish someone would step in and save Hollywood Park from being demolished.

09 Jun 2009 5:47 PM
GeeGees

I was lucky enough to run a shed at Hialeah in the late 90's.  There was not a better surface that I have found anywhere, and that includes the 'new, and better' synthetic surfaces.  There was nothing more majestic than riding thru the paddock and gazing upon the statue of Citation or the wonderful trees.  I hope that it will be reopened, there is a whole generation of racetrackers that haven't experienced the glory of Hialeah.

09 Jun 2009 8:23 PM
AJ

I caught the tail-end of your comments on Sports Nightly.  You sounded great and presented your views very well.  Wish I could have heard all of it!  Hopefully Gabe will have you on again sometime!

09 Jun 2009 8:46 PM
Wanda

When my husband and I would go to Florida for holidays I always had an interest in Hialeah. I went on the site that had been put up about saving it. I was glad to see they got a historic designation for it. There are a committed group of people that helped save it and I'm glad to see that it may go forward now. But what about the guy that wanted to sink a bunch of money into it last year. The present owner wouldn't make a deal with him. Any word on how that turned out?

09 Jun 2009 9:31 PM
jj

I would like to point out that Quarter Horse racing licenses are known generally as just the first step towards getting a thoroughbred license. The track they were attempting to open up near Monticello, Fl, applied for a quarter horse license in order to later achieve a thoroughbred license. It's not done with the intention so much of quarter horse racing as it is thoroughbred racing as the ultimate end goal.

"Quarter horse racing is very big in the south." That's a bit of a generalization and I kinnnnd of resent it. I would have loved to meet a fellow horse racing fan out here but have yet to meet a quarter horse fan much less a thoroughbred fan. Your story obviously trumps my cred a little bit, but I do live in the state.

09 Jun 2009 9:34 PM
MLS

Since talks plans began to save the beautiful Hialeah, I have been so pleased.  There was so much beauty there.  Hopefully, it can return to the wonderful racetrack that it was.  And, how nice it would for people to dress up a bit when in attendance.  I agree with SOMETHINGROYAL regarding saving Hollywood Park and all other racetracks in danger.  I am going to faint if River Downs in Cincinnati, Ohio is closed!

09 Jun 2009 10:01 PM
tedbbjr

I appreciate your passion for Hialeah.  However, your comments are a little naive.  Hialeah is one of the foremost institutions in all of thoroughbred racing.  It is home to some of the greatest horses of all time.  Historically, only the greatest came to Hialeah for the winter to race.  The rest went to winter layups in South Carolina or to California to run against lesser competition.  Very little in the thoroughbred horse industry (perhaps only the summer in Saratoga) can compete with spending the winter at Hialeah.  If it came back it would be one of the greatest and most exciting accomplishments in the history of racing.      

09 Jun 2009 10:32 PM
Ofelia

I grew up in Hialeah during the 70-80's. I remember the racing days very well. The park was beyond beautiful and elegant. The park reflected the nobility and beauty of the thoroughbred much like Keeneland or Calumet does today.

I have been to several racetracks around the country and few rival Hialeah in its heyday. The surrounding areas brimmed with commerce and the Flamingo Derby was always well attended. There were tack shops behind the track and I always tried to sneak a peek through the trees at the horses. The Cubans and other Hispanics love horse racing and I know the locals were upset at the park's demise. My wedding reception was there in the paddock area and I remember the beauty of the occasion in such a romantic and nostalgic setting. The flamingos were there in the infield and the track was still being maintained. Several hurricanes in the 90's damaged several of the wild orchid trees, oaks and some of the royal palms lining the entrance but it still exuded the beauty of its' prime. I remember attending the morning workouts a few years before it closed and watching the horses being ridden back to the stables through tree lined paths, their tails swaying in the breeze. The ghosts of Big Red, Nashua and Citation haunting the old green wooden stables.

The park was a veritable tropical garden; everywhere there were hibiscus bushes in every color, especially flamingo pink, wild orchids, ficus, oaks, massive bouganvillia vines, huge pine trees that blocked the view from the public and the tall elegant royal palms that seemed to touch the clouds as they greeted the visitor approaching the clubhouse.

Ah! Hialeah!

I can't wait to go home again.

09 Jun 2009 10:53 PM
jerseyovaler

Oh,my gosh,Hialeah!Let me tell you about Hialeah.100'royal palms about 20' apart and that was just the driveway into the Park.One entered thru a tropical jungle complete w/all sorts of birds and flora.In front of your entrance was an ornate fountain.Around the fountain were placs w/names like Secratariat,Needles,Carry Back.Then you entered the building.Pink terrazzo floors inlaid w/pink flamingos.Men's rooms as big as the house I grew up in.The paddock had tiered steps that nostalgia forces me to think were marble but probably concrete.When you turned to look at the plant it's ivy covered walls screamed "I'm old world european"and you could escape the outside world for an afternoon.The box seats had these huge wicker chairs W/an iron ledge to hold a cold beverage of choice and the Morning Telegraph in front of you.Hialeah,what a place.  

09 Jun 2009 11:56 PM
EMD

Those of us in South Florida who frequent Calder and Gulfstream throughout the year eagerly anticipate the reopening of Hialeah. We are, therefore, hopeful  things are progressing, albeit not fast enough for us.

One of my great memories of Hialeah was early morning works and "breakfast at Hialeah."  I would take my daughter, now in her 20's.    Who's to say those experiences didn't affect her choice of career.  She's in the midst of her veterinary degree and a great lover of the sport.  

My track buddies and I wait -- breathlessly.

10 Jun 2009 7:39 AM
aspradling

I am enjoying the stories and beginning to learn a bit more about Hialeah's history from the fan's view points. Thank you for everyone's input!

jerseyovaler/Ofelia: That is great stuff, I can almost picture the grand scheme of the park grounds, thanks for that imagery

tedbbjr: You are right, my blog is naive, thanks for filling me in on the park though =) I don't blame anyone for racing in Florida during the winter, because I would like to be there during the winter...unless it is a beautiful fresh snow fall at Keeneland or Turfway.

jj: You have a good point, it is pretty generalized that I would say "Quarter horse racing is very big in the south." I have never met a person from the North who was interested or involved in Quarter horses and was basing that statement on the people I have met from the West and South who have expressed their appreciation for Quarter horses, but that dosn't mean it is "big." So very good point.

AJ: Thanks, I didn't know if anyone would listen since it was short notice and only a few minutes of interview time. I appreciate the feedback.

10 Jun 2009 8:42 AM
MikeM

When I was a kid in the 70's Hialeah was considered THE track in Florida. When that meet ended it seemed like nobody really cared about Gulfstream Park.I loved going there with my father and it was the main reason I got hooked on the sport.

10 Jun 2009 10:23 AM
Somethingroyal

After reading through the replies to is blog. I'm really glad to see Hialeah being brought back to life. I sense many of you have great memories to cherish.    

10 Jun 2009 11:03 AM
howard

Thanks for reminding us of The Flamingo,  I forget that Spectacular Bid was the last horse to win The Flamingo and The Kentucky Derby. Back in 1979 The Bid also won The Hutcheson,Fountain Of Youth and The Florida Derby prior to winning The Flamingo, I call that The Florida Four, I don't think any other horse ever won those four races prior to winning The Kentucky Derby

10 Jun 2009 11:28 AM
LisaS

As a born & raised Miami native and TB-lover, I'm thrilled about Hialeah's reopening.

In the early 70's I used to show my hunter at the annual all-breed show at Hialeah in its off-season.

I've always remembered that beautiful hack from the stables to the show ring on the track in front of the stands.

And I'll never forget my TB/QH cross being a bit hot when warming up in that same ring the day before the '71 show opened and my trainer saying, "Well, go take a gallop around this track and  take some edge off your horse". What a high it was to gallop all out down that backstretch!

10 Jun 2009 12:04 PM
MK in FL

I am from Tampa and only got down to Hialeah a couple times to run horses. The barns amazed me as much as the grandstand and paddock. They were old with wooden floors and all 20 plus were in a straight line that ran along the road. They were separated from the track by a long pine tree lined path that was just breathtaking. Talk about a peaceful and relaxing environment for the horse! It was truly paradise. I hear the barns have been torn down. What a shame. Like someone else mentioned, the track surface had no comparison in the country. It had a great cushion and the horse loved it. I pray they can bring Hialeah back.

10 Jun 2009 12:08 PM
berttheclock

Strange - Hollywood Park is about close and Hialeah is making a comeback.  When Richard Dreyfuss was planning the movie "Let It Ride", he was going to use Hollywood Park.  However, for various financial reasons, he switched the setting to Hialeah.  A track buddy told me this - He was one of the finest "stoopers" in the land - Once,  he was featured in the DRF for an upcoming Breeders Cup at SA - He spent quite some time with Dreyfuss showing him his "socker" foot work flipping tickets. He never reached down for a worthless ticket.  Dreyfuss, for some reason, wrote him out of the movie.

10 Jun 2009 1:13 PM
Carlos' Dagger

Yup, Hialeah/Flamingo Stakes were big-time back in the day.Hopefully they both can get that status back and trump Gulfstream's ridiculously speed-favoring Talladega-esq track.

To tedbbjr:  since when do horses get sent to Cali. to "run against lesser competition?"....that's ludacris and far-fetched.

10 Jun 2009 1:34 PM
joe

I miss the name Seattle Slew in these memories.  His three year old debut was an eye popper, followed with a Flamingo win which-on the far turn-saw him open a double digit lead.  I was at some crowded race years ago, and I overheard two women recall the bigger crowd for Slew's Flamingo. The great horse is very much part of this track's history.

10 Jun 2009 2:52 PM
RobfromBMore

Great and informative comments from many knowledgeable horse racing fans from Florida. Great to hear about the interest in the great Hialeah. I am 43 and living in Maryland. I can't say I visited Hialeah even in the 1980's. Hialeah sounds like a paradise as Keeneland is today. Let's hope if they get back Hialeah to running it will done right. Mr. Halsey Minor was the multi-millionaire from California who wants to re-open Hialeah. Nice to hear so many great historical comments from so many passionate fans.

10 Jun 2009 5:10 PM
Burton DeWitt

Please fix this error. The Flamingo Stakes was a Grade I "in its day," but a Grade III when last ran in 2001. The "in its day" implies when the race was at its peak, and it was at its peak until the first time Hialeah closed in the 1990s. Therefore, it makes sense that the race was bigger than the Florida Derby, considering it was held after it and still long enough before the Derby to be an important major prep race.

10 Jun 2009 6:33 PM
Things Don't Change

While, I agree with the comments about the beauty of Hialeah, the underlying reasons for Hialeah's demise haven't changed.

Mr. Brunetti is only proceeding with this to open a Casino.  

The racing will NEVER be what it was in its hayday.

10 Jun 2009 8:41 PM
merrywriter

Just the beautiful sound of its name fit the descriptions of Hialeah.

I never got there.  But just watching the races on TV with those flamingos in the middle was a treat.  I always thought Hollywood needed them.  The birds themselves created the popularity of the Flamingo.

After gardening for 40 years and seeing pictures of it, I can say the track and all around it was a masterpiece in landscape architecture.  How much of the landscaping is left?  People don't realize the tropical paradise Florida once was, i.e. the old Cypress Gardens.  

Hialeah's beauty made people want to go there, but of course horse racing was a more popular sport then also.  The incessant sound of slot bells and blinking lights will do nothing to enhance horse racing which is an outside sport.  A day at the races.  A day for the birds.

12 Jun 2009 6:15 PM
needler in Virginia

In a way, Things Don't Change, I must agree with your comments. HOWEVER, Hialeah was, and could be again, THE place to be.....right alongside Keeneland and Saratoga. There was a mystique and atmosphere at Hialeah, a feeling and a real flavor in the air (and DO NOT get nasty about air flavors). One always knew that it was a truly classy place for fans. Grounds, tall funny-looking pink birds, flowers, nice folks, tall funny-looking pink birds, GORGEOUS horses, elegant owners, dignified 'cappers, really UNdignified 'cappers, tall funny-looking pink birds, wonderful racing in a wonderful place. I miss it enormously, not the least for its' sheer elegance. All that said, its' location stinks and the surrounding area is, at best, mildly dangerous. Don't think I'd make a habit of wandering around it at night, either. If slots are the only way to open it again, then so be it (she said grumpily), but its' rejuvenation just MIGHT help clean up the area a bit (she said naively). It would just be a damned shame to lose that beautiful place, and I'm glad that someone is trying to keep it alive.

Jason, just go look at it sometime and  you can see what once was.....and might be again.

Cheers, and safe trips to all.

13 Jun 2009 11:45 AM
Larry Hale

Myself and and 5 other friends drove from Toronto to Marathon in the Keys and on our return trip we attended Hialeah and it was one of the most beautiful race tracks that I have attended. Sad to see her dormant for so many years. Northern Dancer won there and will always be a great memory of my visit there.

13 Jun 2009 11:47 AM
needler in Virginia

OH, HELL! My apologies.....ADAM, not Jason. Sorry!

13 Jun 2009 11:49 AM
GAMBLER911

I STARTED GOING TO HIALEAH IN THE EARLY SEVENTIES EVERY WINTER FOR TWO-THREE WEEKS MY VACATIONS WERE PLANNED AROUND IT....I USED TO SIT UP IN THE CLUBHOUSE AND "JIMMY THE GREEK "SNYDER AND THE LATE "PETE AXTHELM USED TO SIT NEXT TO ME..AS SOON AS THERE TELEVISION JOBS AND THE SUPER BOWL WAS OVER THEY BOTH WERE DEGENERATES AND AT THE TRACK EVERYDAY...I GAVE THE GREEK AN 11/ 1 SHOT ONE DAY IN A 7 FURLONG RACE THAT CLOSED DOWN THE STRETCH AND BLEW BY THE FIELD..PETE PLAYED IT THE GREEK SHOOK HIS HEAD..HE SAID HOW THE HELL DID YOU COME UP WITH THAT ONE..I SAID JIMMY THE HORSE RAN THE LAST QUARTER IN HIS PREVIOUS RACE AT 6 FURLONGS IN 23 2/5THS. TODAY WE GOT THE EXTRA FURLONG EASY GAME....JOHN BRUNETTI WHEN HE REOPENED THE TRACK DID A VERY POOR JOB IN MY OPINION HE LET A TRACK KNOWN FOR ITS AMBIENCE TO GO DOWN THE TUBES IN DISREPAIR...HE WOULDNT EVEN PUT A FRESH COAT OF PAINT ON IT AND THE PLACE WAS A TOTAL FLOP....IF THE TRACK REOPENS DUE TO ITS LOCATION AND SUB-PAR CHEAP RACING IT WILL BE A FLOP AGAIN...THERE IS ZERO HOPE FOR THIS RACETRACK....SORRY GUYS THE GLORY DAYS ARE LONG GONE AS IS THE CASE FOR MOST TRACKS IN AMERICA...THERES ONLY ONE GEM LEFT IN THE ENTIRE RACING INDUSTRY AND THATS SARATOGA...GOOD LUCK HIALEAH WILL BE A TOTAL BUST.TRUST ME ON THAT.....

14 Jun 2009 7:11 AM
aspradling

Thanks for the continued varying opinions and insight, I have learned so much and am hoping the grounds are restored with pristine.

needler: no offense taken =) no worries

gambler: just for future reference, all caps are hard to read for most, maybe turn off caps lock, but thanks for the counter points and I hope the new owners are diligent. Here's to hope, eh

15 Jun 2009 10:40 AM
habashee

I went first to Hialeah  in 1965 when i was 15. The reason Hialeah ruled then was that it permanently was given the prime middle dates among the three tracks.. and these dates coincided with the peak of tourist season. As the neighborhood deteriorated, Gulfstream made the case that they would get more handle if they had the dates and eventually they won that argument and rotated them and Hialeah fell as the tourist traffic really moved up from Miami Beach to Ft Lauderdale and the riots in Liberty City pretty much spelled doom for Hialeah. It is widely regarded as the most beautiful track in the country and always has been with only Saratoga and Santa Anita mentioned in the same breath

15 Jun 2009 12:34 PM
jamie

nothing will ever be the same as it was,kind of like your first sweetheart,hialea,willalways be asweet memory.racing is dying,we need new younger blood in our game. that is for another topic. unfortunately racetracks need these casinos.maybe we need a  commisioner.go out and bet two bucks  

15 Jun 2009 6:55 PM
GAMBLER911

HABASHEE.....you hit it right on the head as well since so many people left dade county through the years and headed north to broward-palm beach-martin counties..hialeah is a difficult drive to say the least for people considering a day at the track,metro rail built a stop right at the track which is convenient.....but as i stated the neighborhood the crime and everything associated with it chased people away to suburbia...someone mentioned quarter horses in one of the post above what a flop idea for east coast horse players...pompano tried a quarter horse meeting one winter they averaged about 300 fans a night,it was a flop to say the least.....hialeah should never reopen under the guise of becoming a slot machine palace....

16 Jun 2009 1:55 PM
sweet terchi

Good news! Not only is a track saved but  a lot of people will have jobs!! A lot of great memories about Hialeah posted here!

17 Jun 2009 1:04 PM
Hialeah Native

I was born and raised in Hialeah - 10 minutes from this wonderful racetrack.  I passed the stables every morning on my way to school for eight years.  I cried when they were torn down and when the racetrack closed I turned my back on horse racing.  I've only recently begun to get back into it and it was the rumors of a possible resurrection of Hialeah Park that made me get back into it.  

Of all the comments on this blog, only one is from a native Hialeah resident.  This track is DEEPLY loved by the locals.  Everyone feels that the city's survival and revival is intricately tied to that track.  Yes, the area around it could use some sprucing up but I take offense with those on this blog who call it 'dangerous' and 'crime-ridden' and that 'they wouldn't walk the streets at night'.  My mother still lives there and I visit her very regularly.  That area is no different than any economically struggling neighborhood.  Yes, there is crime but it's no different than that around Tampa Bay Downs, Calder or Gulfstream.  Their areas just look a little nicer because many of the buildings around Hialeah are so much older.  

The city of Hialeah is buzzing with excitement over it's Grand Dame re-opening and the city hasn't been that excited and galvanized in a long time.  It's reopening will strengthen the neighborhood.  The city is already allocating grant money to help residents fix up their homes and businesses.  There are already plans to spruce up the landscaping in the neighborhoods around the park.  All of this is bringing back a lot of pride to the residents of Hialeah and especially those who live in the shadow of that great racetrack.

There were many mistakes made in the managing of Hialeah Park during it's "fall" and I'm not going to waste time pointing fingers.  Everyone here has the information to debate those endlessly.  However, unless you LIVE there, I would refrain from passing judgment on the neighborhood and it's ability to rebound because you just don't have a clue.

I truly believe there is a great chance for this track to be successful again.  If it means they have to bring in casino games, so be it... more jobs is the way I see it.  Good luck to Hialeah Park!  I look forward to cruising down it's palm lined entrance road, enjoying the flamingos and standing before the stunning statue of Citation that struck me with such awe as a child.    

17 Jun 2009 11:13 PM
aspradling

Thank you Hialeah Native for that great write up on living around the track. I am very excited for your mother and fellow residents near the park.

18 Jun 2009 8:24 AM
sarcsm1

I was astarry eyed teenager starting in racing my first winter at Hialeah.  As an exercise rider, there was no better place or more beautiful track.  It wasn't just the middle dates that made it the winter place to be, but the beautiful facility with giant palms, old beauganvillas, the flamingos, and a horsepath covered with a canopy of trees.  It was a great and safe surface.  Gulfstream has never achieved the ambiance and stature Hialeah had in her day. There are rr tracks that run next to it from the days when the horses came down by train and owners had private train cars.  I galloped horses there one year and I was the first horse on the track all season.  As I rounded the clubhouse turn on a horse for Penna and the Phipps stable, the track was covered with flamingos that hadn't had to move since the previous spring.  As I passed the 7/8 pole the flock of flamingos split in two as the birds started to flee and it was like riding through a parting sea of pink birds.  It is a moment that has stuck in my mind ever since as one of my greatest moments in racing.  I love Hialeah, and I hope she can be reborn,just as I now race in Ca and am very sad at the impending closure of Hollywood, which is also beautiful, and can never be replaced if it is torn down.

Swartzenegger needs to pass slots

21 Jun 2009 2:26 PM
Wanda

sarcsm1:When were you galloping there? I rubbed a nice horse that held the 6F track record there his name was Intercontinent.He was brought up to Canada and held 3 track records at Assiniboia Downs,5 1/2,6 and 7F.

22 Jun 2009 12:05 PM
Wanda

Hialeah Native: I hear you. I've been to all 3 you mentioned also Pompano and the neighborhood around Gulfstream is kind of scary. I'm from Calgary, Alberta and work for the Calgary Ex and Stampede and the area around it was very bad (inner city) until the Stampede bought up all the crack houses, tore them down and that land is now part of their 10 year plan. The area is looking better every year, businesses are putting money into it, the city and CE&S are planting trees etc. If the support is there you can do it.

22 Jun 2009 12:16 PM
Zortman

Read this little tidbit about the Flamingo stakes and Paul Tibbetts, the pilot who flew the ENOLA GAY (the plane that dropped the BOMB).

www.acepilots.com/usaaf_tibbets.html

22 Jun 2009 1:59 PM
aspradling

Hi Wanda!  

Zortman: Thanks so much, what a great find and testament!

23 Jun 2009 5:07 PM
Wanda

Hey mister you need a new topic for the week or were you on a holiday?

23 Jun 2009 5:38 PM
js444

I rode the train from louisville ky to Hialeah park in 1946 with my mothers horse Harriet Sue who finished 2 in the kentucky oaks. I have just turned 89 years old and I am a horse trainer and would love to win one more race at the Grand Dam of Racing Hialeah Park.

23 Jun 2009 7:39 PM

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