Home

0624726
Ratings Generated in 2014
Featured Stallion

Looking Back at A.P. Indy

2012 will be the first breeding season without A.P. Indy as an active stallion since he retired to Lane's End in 1993. Now 23 years old, the two-time leading sire was pensioned last April due to declining fertility. Sire of 1,119 foals and 142 stakes winners, A.P. Indy commanded a $300,000 stud fee for a large portion of his stud career.

A.P. Indy as a foal in 1989. Photo by Sue Lustig.

Bred by Will Farish and W.S. Kilroy, A.P. Indy is by the great Triple Crown winner Seattle Slew, and produced from the grade III-winning and multiple grade I-placed Secretariat mare Weekend Surprise. Offered at the 1990 Keeneland July Sale, the ridgling brought a final bid of $2.9 million, a price certainly bolstered by his half brother Summer Squall's win in the Preakness Stakes (gr. I) just two months earlier. The successful bid came from Tomonori Tsurumaki, who named the colt in honor of his recently-opened Nippon Autopolis, where Tsurumaki hoped to host a Formula One (Indy Car) event.

A.P. Indy at the 1990 Keeneland July Sale, where he sold for $2.9 million. Photo by Anne Eberhardt.

Trained by Neil Drysdale, A.P. Indy won four grade I races: the Hollywood Futurity, Santa Anita Derby, Belmont Stakes, and Breeders' Cup Classic, culminating his racing career with 1992 champion 3-year-old and Horse of the Year titles.

A.P. Indy has sired 26 grade I winners to date, and his top sons Pulpit (TrueNicks,SRO), Malibu Moon (TrueNicks,SRO), Congrats (TrueNicks,SRO), Mineshaft (TrueNicks,SRO), and Bernardini (TrueNicks,SRO), as well as Pulpit's son Tapit (TrueNicks,SRO), look to continue the success of the sire line.

Filed under: , ,

15 Comments:

A.P.Indy is the "patriarch" of a long line of "winners"

and a horse for the ages.... besides he is still the best

looking fella around.

nan 17 Jan 2012 6:07 PM

Wow, what a horse!!  It is fabulous that Seattle Slew lives on through the great AP, and his fabulous son Bernardini.  I think that Bernardini will be prove to be AP's greatest stallion son.

skyfire 17 Jan 2012 8:05 PM

I have had a great experience with the A.P.Indy sire Abduction crossing him with mares of the Northern Dancer family. He transmits stamina & speed and has a great scope of lines with which he crosses well.

Diego Garcia 18 Jan 2012 6:31 AM

Thank you for the beautiful pictures of this wonderful horse!!  How is he doing in his retirement?  Would love to see some pics of him in his retirement mode.  

LongStoryTB 18 Jan 2012 9:30 AM

A grand-looking boy from foaling on! His running style was quite unusual, but he almost always managed to get there. His true brilliance, and the aspect that will always be most memorable, came in the breeding shed. I'm so glad there are so many of his sons (and grandsons) now successful in the breeding shed. I look forward to seeing his branch of the Slew-line continue.

Melissa P 18 Jan 2012 11:03 AM

I remember him falling to his knees at the gate, and STILL winning. He was great to watch!! I remember how low he carried his head while running. He is such a pretty guy!

Kari 18 Jan 2012 12:37 PM

Just curious... have always been an AP Indy fan for many reasons, but have been a bit leery due to his being a monorchid--- in other breeds (and in dogs) this is a HUGE negative...

In the racing industry this appears to be only a minor inconvenience, with half-castration being done (as was done on Indy in his early creer. Since this is a genetic trait, I'm wondering how many of his sons (and sons of his daughters) have inherited this? It has cropped up a lot in the Slew line so I assume Indy follows right along...  

Monorchidism or cryptorchidism, if left uncorrected, can lead to cancer and other ailments; not being a vet I can't comment more, but I am interested in hearing from someone who can clarify this for me.

Being a ridgling certainly hasn't bothered (assuming, of course, they had the glandectomy) many well known runners. And auction buyers aren't mightily thirown off by it either.

By all means, more news on this most illustrious horse, and a "visit" to him in his retirement, would be most welcome.

longtimeracingfan 18 Jan 2012 3:27 PM

longtimeracingfan,

You should check out The Horse's section on cryptorchidism which has several interesting articles, many from the science side. One link there mentions Roman Ruler, who had an undescended testicle removed while in training.

Thoroughbreds aren't (directly) selected for fertility traits, so many of these reproductive-related issues have to be managed. That being said, my understanding is that cryptorchidism itself is not a cause of subfertility (one functional testicle is adequate for fertility).

Ian Tapp 18 Jan 2012 4:10 PM

To answer the question, it is something that in this case may be inherited via the female line. There are a number of horses from the Lassie Dear family that had one testicle removed at some stage in their race career. Mambo in Seattle and Court Vision spring to mind in recent times.

Byron Rogers 18 Jan 2012 5:42 PM

Ian......on a side note....how about an article on Saint Liam.....what could have been....his stats....97 foals...82 starters, 65 winners..13 black type....3 graded.....Champion Older Female...HOY......pretty impressive...thx

BILL CAR 19 Jan 2012 8:42 AM

Does anyone have some contact info. for the photographer who took that pic of Indy as a foal?

Would love an 8X10 print to hang in my study.

Regards to all!

Rodney 19 Jan 2012 10:26 AM

A (journalist's) call to one of the top equine teratologists might shed some light on the genetics of equine cryptorchidism. As I understand it, it's cause is often genetic, but the precise genetic mechanism(s) not fully appreciated. It appears that the condition does have an impact on fertility. Amusing, isn't it, that those so motivated to expunge EIPH from the breed rarely, if ever, state concern about cyptochidism when the former is causally less genetic than the latter.

sceptre 19 Jan 2012 11:13 AM

Ian, Byron, sceptre, thanks for your comments and input. Yeah, just think how much longer Indy might have gone with all his equipment!!! I knew about Roman Ruler, but did not know about Court Vision. There are a number of others out there too. Both racing and at stud.

BTW over the years I have had several colts, born with two testicles, that did not drop them until nearly yearlings... and one colt (born with two) did not drop them until he was about 16 months; in fact when I hauled him from Colorado to California the CO brand inspector called him a gelding--- that "gelding" had two normal testicles a few weeks later, and was fully fertile until his death at 26 as the aftermath of a spinal injury. I still have several of his kids... and all are normal and, in the case of the daughters, have produced normal colts (both testicles dropped at normal ages).

Thanks for bypassing my dreadful typos.... and yes, Bill Car, what a wonderful contribution Saint Liam made in his all too brief life.    

longtimeracingfan 19 Jan 2012 5:01 PM

A.P. Indy I don't think will ever his due justice not only as a racehorse, but also as a sire at stud. He had 142 stake winners when they were not shuttling sires to the Southern Hemisphere. Nor were their crops anywhere as large as they are now.The first thing you knew when you had a A.P. Indy foal was how healthy they were. The rest is history and sadly to say is the fact of us no longer seeing A.P.'s offspring on the track much longer.

Respectfully-Jeff Brass

Jeff Brass 19 Jan 2012 5:56 PM

For a stud that did not shuttle down to the south such as the Coolmore horses did he will never get full credit for his 142 stakes winners here in the U.S. his horses were full of vigor & ability to run all distances and race courses thru out the road. A.P.'s horses will show up for generations to come as hard honest horses. Not horses for courses. But horses that are as honest as they come.

Jeff Brass 26 Jan 2012 4:11 PM

Leave a Comment

All comments are moderated and must be approved before they are posted. The blog author reserves the right to edit or omit any comment.

  (Appears with your comment) (required)
  (Will not be published) (required)
  (required)